Cultural monuments

Telenor Heritage manages a conservation plan of technical and industrial heritage. The cultural heritage tells of the development of the telegraph, telephone, coastal radio and broadcasting services from the latter half of the 1800s to the present day.

Røde telefonkiosker. Akershuskaia i Oslo 001

The people's favourite

Nostalgic men and women all over Norway never get tired of posting pictures of the red design icon.

Fredet radiostasjon i Ny-Ålesund fra 1918

The telegraph station in Ny-Ålesund

Roald Amundsen, the polar explorer, came here to set his watch to Paris-time.

Administrasjonsbygninger, Kongensgate 21, Oslo historisk 1

The telegraph building

Only a stone’s throw from Karl Johans gate is one of the capital’s grandest buildings.

Røde telefonkiosker. Arkitekt Georg Fredrik Fastings tegning fra 1932

Designing an icon

The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway.

Telegrafstasjoner Lødingen interiør historisk

A telegrapher's choice

Lødingen telegraph station was the main central for all tele-traffic in northern Norway.

Innvending bilde av Åsen nødsentral. Bunker med kontorstoler og skrivepult.

The Doomsday room

A reminder of how the Cold War affected Norway.

The last manual telephone exchange in Norway

The sami telephone exchange

The last manual telephone exchange in Norway was closed down as late as in 1993.

Telefonsentraler Litlefjord automatkiosk

Automatic exchange in Litlefjord

This automatic telephone exchange is so remotely placed that Rolf Mathisen describes it as a place “behind Our Lord’s back.”

Linjekurser Notodden Hjartdal

The preserved line course between Notodden and Hjartdal

For some it’s hard to imagine that there can be anything special about telephone poles – until you have driven across Bamlesletta in Notodden.

Lager  med kabeltromler

Dolviken sea cable depot

The red and yellow building from 1960 is the last sea cable house in Norway which is still in operation, but its time is inexorably coming to an end.

Telefonsentraler Miland

The fitter's base at Miland

The pin-up calendar in the workshop insists that the year is 1967, and the clock over the workbench stopped a long time ago.

Radiostasjoner. Rundemanen eksteriør 5

Rundemanen radio

On top of one of Bergen’s seven mountains is the residue of what used to be Norway’s most important coastal radio.

Montørstadjoner, verksteder og lagre. Stabekk smie eksteriør

The smithy at Stabekk

The smithy was once used to make the telecom fitter’s tools.

Linjekurser. Mattisdalen stolpeskjøt

We would not be broken

During the Second World War, 31.500 telegraph poles were destroyed by the German invaders.

Radio - og kringkastingsstasjoner Rogaland radio mottakerstasjon Skjæveland eksteriør

Rogaland radio

In 1960 the world’s most advanced short-wave radio station opened at Skjæveland, Sandnes.

Find cultural monuments in map

  • Svanebekkstua in Finnmark

    Børselvfjellet
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    The Svanebekkstua is one of few supervisors’ huts kept in almost original condition. It’s situated in an area out on the Finnmark plateau which is used by the Sami people as a slaughter site. It’s said that the hut is haunted. Of the line course passing by the hut, 10 poles have been protected. Location: Børselvfjellet, Finnmark Gnr./bnr.: 10/1 (Property registration number) Year of construction: 1950s

  • The smithy at Stabekk

    Gamle Drammensvei 25,
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    In the old smithy at Stabekk in Bærum, the artist, Therese Mathiesen, hammers out abstract sculptures over the same anvil which was once used to make the telecom fitter’s tools.

  • Pepparstein at Haukelifjell

    Haukelifjell, Pepparstein
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    The two rest cabins at, respectively, Dyrskar and Pepparstein, are situated no more than a couple of kilometres apart. The huts have been described as “survival shelters”, and rightfully so, because this stretch is one of Haukelifjell’s most weather beaten. The huts are situated in the stretch at the highest altitude, near the old highway over Haukelifjell. The road is only open in the summer season after the new route has been laid through a tunnel and the line in a cable. The hut at Pepparstein contains a small loft space, and it is said that Norway’s largest fox was shot from here, if we are to believe what has been scratched into the wall. Location: Haukelifjell, Hordaland Year of construction: Approx. 1930

  • Dyrskar at Haukelifjell

    Haukelifjell, Dyrskar
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    The two rest cabins at, respectively, Dyrskar and Pepparstein, are situated no more than a couple of kilometres apart. The huts have been described as “survival shelters”, and rightfully so, because this stretch is one of Haukelifjell’s most weather beaten. The huts are situated in the stretch at the highest altitude, near the old highway over Haukelifjell. The road is only open in the summer season after the new route has been laid through a tunnel and the line in a cable. The line has now been removed. Location: Haukelifjell, Hordaland Year of construction: Approx. 1930

  • Meheia automatic telephone exchange

    Meheia
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    The Meheia automatic telephone exchange was built in 1953 and represents a typical «standard house», a later extension houses an outside toilet. The exchange was built as an LO-30, also known as a “farmer’s exchange”. Around 1970 this was replaced with a type 8B- exchange. The installation is intact and incorporates an exchange of the type Philips 12-channel radio line. There is no operation here today, but Telenor has a newer telephone exchange in function on the same plot.

  • Miland automatic telephone exchange

    Miland
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    The Miland automatic telephone exchange was constructed in 1956, originally for a XY-exchange, but this was later replaced with a KV-exchange. This has been preserved. The exchange is part of a larger environment surrounding Miland fitter’s base with workshops, storage areas and a breakroom, all part of Telenor Kulturarv’s protection plan.

  • Kråkstad automatic telephone exchange

    Kråkstad
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    This building is one of many specially adapted to house the type 8B telephone exchange. The exchange had 600 lines, and it’s the only one kept at its original location. What is particularly interesting about this protected site is that several generations of equipment is preserved within. One half of the installation is still in operation.

  • Hinna automatic telephone exchange

    Hinna
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    The Hinna automatic telephone exchange was built by the private company, Stavanger Telefonforretning. With its neoclassical style, the building is adapted to the villa-area where it is situated, and has seen little change since it was opened in January, 1930. At the point of transferring to an automatic service, Hinna exchange had 118 subscribers. However, it had the capacity to service 160.

  • Lommedalen automatic telephone exchange

    Lommedalen
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    The Lommedalen automatic telephone exchange was built to house a 7Dd exchange, and was put into service in 1939. Of those of its type that are preserved, this exchange is one of the most authentic, and still to be found within the building. The building is a red brick construction with a pyramidal roof, which is typical of the first exchanges dating from the 1920s to the Second World War. It is well proportioned and an example of the architectural style, functionalism.

  • Råstad automatic telephone exchange

    Råstad
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    The Råstad automatic telephone exchange was built in 1942 by Sandefjord og Omegns Telefonforening and was taken over by Telegrafverket from 1 January 1956. The technical equipment dating from 1942 is preserved.

  • Litlefjord automatic telephone exchange

    Råstad
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    The automatic telephone exchange in Litlefjord was built in 1975/76 to house a FS-20 exchange with habitational quarters. The building is in its entirety constructed out of wood. This exchange is typical of the unmanned automatic exchanges common in Northern Norway where employees often have the need to spend the night due to long distances. The habitational quarters are frugally equipped with a dry toilet to the left near the entrance. The kitchen with a cooker and the bunk bed is to the right. There is no running water.

  • Håfoss automatic telephone exchange

    Håfoss
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    The Håfoss automatic telephone exchange at Etne is a small building of a mere 7 square meters. It is clad in eternit with roofing felt covering the typical «toad roof». The original exchange (FS-40) is no longer intact, but an equivalent model has been reinstated. Håfoss exchange is one of several examples where a new exchange has been alongside the old. The new exchange was in all likelihood established in the 80s.

  • Jeløy automatic telephone exchange

    Jeløy
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    The house in Amtmannsveien 12 is a building of contrasts. Both in that it’s clearly different to its villa-neighbours, and in that its minimalist and humble outer skin hides a complex and pulsating inner life; a telephone exchange. This is the tele communicational hub of Jeløya, in the municipality of Moss. There are several generations of technological equipment present here, the original units installed in 1974 side by side with the latest mobile telephone exchange. These so called LN-halls are a well-known sight for many. They were erected using prefabricated concrete elements from engineer P.A Bakkejord A/S. The first appeared towards the end of the sixties. Several hundred of them were constructed right up until the 1980s.

  • Finnås auomatic telephone exchange

    1219, Finnås, Kulleseid
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    The Finnås automatic telephone exchange represents a typical «container exchange». Made of steel, it was originally built for an ARK-521 exchange, which has now been replaced with a 400 number, AXE-RSS. The nearest neighbour to the exchange is the first building to have been owned by Telenor and Norway’s oldest telegraph house, Kulleseid Telegraph Station at Finnsås, Bømlo. The two buildings are situated just a few meters apart.

  • Fluberg automatic telephone exchange

    Kirkebakka 15, Fluberg
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    The Fluberg automatic telephone exchange was put into service on 22 January 1968. The building is clad in Eternit with felt roofing. It contains a 300 number, XY- exchange. Today, this is Norway’s only complete XY-exchange kept in its original site. The exchange’s technical equipment stems from a time span, between 1930 and 1970. The exchange went out of service in 1980, but may be reactivated for the benefit of the public. If you wanted to place a long-distance phone call from Fluberg, it would have to go through Odnes’s or Hov in Land’s manual telephone exchanges for further connection. A new exchange, currently in service, is situated next to the old.

  • Telephone box at Akershuskaia in Oslo

    Akershuskaia
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    100 telephone booths remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone booth at Henrik Ibsens gate in Oslo

    Henrik Ibsens gate 1, Akershuskaia
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone booth at Sagene in Oslo

    Dannevigsveien 17, Sagene
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone booth at Krøderen

    Krødern torg, Krøderen
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Nevlunghavn

    Nevlunghavn brygge, Nevlunghavn
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Horten

    Rustadbrygga 4, Nevlunghavn
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Sandefjord

    Peter Castbergs gate, Nevlunghavn
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Tønsberg

    Grev Wedelsgate 17, Nevlunghavn
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Tønsberg

    Grev Wedelsgate 17, Nevlunghavn
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Bodø

    Dronningensgate 100, Nevlunghavn
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Jektvik, Rødøy

    Jektvik, Nevlunghavn
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Bardu

    Bardu
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Hammerfest

    Sjøgata 4, Hammerfest
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Honningsvåg

    Storgata 2, Honningsvåg
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone booth at Frognerparken in Oslo

    Vigelandsanlegget, Frognerparken
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone booth at Kongsberg

    Myntgata 4, Frognerparken
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone booth at Rødtangen

    Rødtangen, Holmsbu
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Jomfruland

    Jomfruland
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Siljan

    Heivannsveien, Jomfruland
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Skien

    Moflatvegen 4, Jomfruland
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Rjukan

    Sam Eydes gate 303, Rjukan
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Gjerstad

    Gjerstad stasjon, Rjukan
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Lyngør

    Lyngør
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Tvedstrand

    Fritz Smiths gate 5, Lyngør
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Risør

    Strandgata 10, Lyngør
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Sira in Flekkefjord

    Sira jernbanestasjon, Sira
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Kristiansand S.

    Hamresandveien 7, Hamresanden
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Sandnes

    Haakon 7. gate , Hamresanden
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Sola

    Sola rådhus, Solakrossen
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Stavanger

    Skansekaien, Solakrossen
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Stavanger

    Strandkaien, Solakrossen
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Kinsarvik

    Kinsarvik
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone booth at Bygdøy in Oslo

    Huk Aveny 35 , Bygdøy
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Verdens Ende

    Helgerødveien 590, Verdens Ende
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Ølen

    Ølen kai, Verdens Ende
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Kinsarvik

    Kinsarvik
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Voss

    Hardangervegen 1, Voss
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Bergen

    Fløyfjellet 1 B, Fløyfjellet
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Nordheimsund

    Fløyfjellet
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Bergen

    Sandviksveien 2, Sandviken
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Bryggen, Bergen

    Bryggen 11, Bryggen
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Bergen

    Strandgata 197, Nykirkealmenningen
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Bergen

    Klosteret 17, Nykirkealmenningen
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Lærdal

    Øyragata 42, Lærdal
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Sandane

    Nordstrandvegen 12, Sandane
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Høyanger

    Storgata 5, Sandane
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Gjøvik

    Øvre Torvgate 3, Gjøvik
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    I dag står det igjen 100 telefonkiosker i Norge – og du står foran en av dem! De ble vernet som kulturminner i 2007. Selv om summetonen er borte, har telefonkioskene viktige historier å fortelle. Historier om en tid da du ikke kunne putte telefonen i lommen. Ikke noe annet offentlig bygg vekker vel så mange personlige minner hos så mange mennesker? Folkets kjærlighet for telefonkiosken har sin naturlige forklaring. På et tidspunkt var det utplassert over 6000 telefonkiosker i Norge, fra Lindesnes i sør til Hammerfest i Nord. Historien om telefonkiosken er på mange måter historien om oss. ”Det vakreste produktet fra denne tida, en upåaktet nyskapning fra kromepoken, fins det tusenvis av, på alle gatehjørner fra Rådhusplassen i Oslo til Nordkapp. Det er verdens mest elegante telefonkiosk, i knallrødt og sink.” Forfatter Hans Magnus Enzensberger, ”Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. ”Den røde telefonkiosken representerer en ekte modernistisk manifestasjon, et uttrykk for det moderne Norge. I tillegg til den raffinerte arkitektoniske utformingen, har telefonkioskens utbredelse over det ganske land gjort den til et landemerke.” Norsk Arkitekturmuseum ved Birgitte Sauge, brev datert 11.11.1998. ”DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) ser den røde telefonkiosken som et arkitekturikon og som et viktig uttrykk for funksjonalismen i Norge. Den røde telefonkiosken er dessuten en viktig representant for det forrige århundres modernisme og norsk telekommunikasjon.” DOCOMOMO Norge

  • Telephone box in Otta

    Ola Dahls gate 1, Otta
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Lom

    Lom
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Lillehammer

    Kirkegata 45, Lillhammer
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Lillehammer

    Maihaugvegen 1, Lillehammer
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Tolga

    Tolga
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Skarnes

    Stasjonsveien 20, Skarnes
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Kongsvinger

    Storgata 100, Kongsvinger
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Moss

    Wulfsbergs gate 20, Moss
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Geiranger

    Union Hotell, Geiranger
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Åndalsnes

    Eidet 1, Åndalsnes
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Røst

    Røst
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Sørvågen

    Sørvågen
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone booth at Skøyen in Oslo

    Drammensveien 157, Skøyen
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Austad

    Styrmoes vei 33, Austad
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Fagernes

    Tyinvegen 27, Fagernes
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Drevsjø in Engerdal

    Drevsjø
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Vinstra

    Nedregata 49, Vinstra
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Stabekk, Bærum

    Gamle Drammensvei 36, Stabekk
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Svinesund

    Svinesund
    Show directions

    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Sunndalsøra

    Mongsugata 2, Sunndalsøra
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Tromsø

    Turistvegen 3, Tromsø
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Sagene in Oslo

    Dannevigsveien 17, Sagene
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Stavanger

    St. Svithunsgate 12, Kannik
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Hvitsten

    Hvitstenveien 65, Hvitsten
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Hølen

    Dronningveien 3, Hølen
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Ålesund

    Kongensgate 6, Hølen
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Festøy, Barstadvik

    Festøy ferjekai, Barstadvik
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Stjørdal

    Øyvegen 18, Hell
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Steinkjer

    Kongensgate 26, Steinkjer
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Tana

    Rådhusveien 2, Tana
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone booth at Majorstua in Oslo

    Jacob Aalls gate 58, Tana
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Majorstua in Oslo

    Kirkeveien 64, Majorstua
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone booth at Parkveien in Oslo

    Parkveien 80, Majorstua
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone booth at Bygdøy in Oslo

    Museumsveien 10, Bygdøy
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone booth at Olav Kyrres plass in Oslo

    Olav Kyrres plass 1, Bygdøy
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone booth at Bjerke in Oslo

    Refstadsvingen 2, Bjerke
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone booth at Rådhusgata in Oslo

    Rådhusgata 28, Bjerke
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone booth at Skedsmogata in Oslo

    Skedsmogata 20, Bjerke
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone booth at Solli plass in Oslo

    Sommerrogata 17, Solli plass
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone booth at Bislett in Oslo

    Theresesgate, Bislett
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone booth at Ullevål hageby in Oslo

    Vestgrensa 2, Ullevål hageby
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Hyggen

    Grimsrudveien 48, Østre Røyken, Hyggen
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Drøbak

    Kroketønna 4, Drøbak
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Rånåsfoss

    Rånåsfoss
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Bjørke, Ørsta

    Bjørke
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Årvik, Larsnes

    Årvik, Larsnes
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Fredrikstad

    Voldgaten 98, Fredrikstad
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Trondheim

    Kirkegata 35, Trondheim
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Lademoen in Trondheim

    Mellomveien 5, Lademoen
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box at Røros

    Malmplassen, Røros
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Vadsø

    W. Andersens gate 1, Vadsø
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Telephone box in Vardø

    Strandgaten 28, Vardø
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • Kabelstein mellom Kongsberg og Moss

    Kongsberg-Hokksund
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    A cable stone is a marker in cast concrete showing the placement of a long-distance cable in the terrain. Usually the cables would be rigged up on state owned land and in many cases they would follow the roads, but wherever the route could be shortened by going over private ground, this would be done. The cable sign on the stone would face the cable trench. The number on the sign was in turn a referral to the cable map. In this way, it was easy to find the nearest cable splice and the distance to the nearest measuring station. Some stones were simply marked with “K.” These cable stones would mark out the route of the long-distance cable between Kongsberg and Hokksund.

  • The antenna masts at Skjæveland in Sandnes

    Skjæveland
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    The installation consists of 30 wooden masts in formation. The masts are approximately 20 meters high and carry directional antennas for short wave receivers, so called rhombic antennas. The antenna amplifier was equipped with a distribution matrix making it possible for many operators to use the same antenna simultaneously without weakening the signals. The amplifier was designed and produced in the workshops of Telegrafverket and is unique to Norway.

  • The telegraph building in Bergen

    Starvhusgaten 4, Bergen
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    With its flamboyant façade facing the city park, the telegraph building in Bergen has become a familiar part of the cityscape in this the capital of western Norway. The building was finished in 1927 and received two years later the A.C. Houen’s fund’s prize for excellence in architecture. The construction work started in 1924 at a time when Norwegian architecture was drawn between the “real” and indigenous materials and the elegance of the Gregorian style. This tug of war led to a synthesis enveloping both the elegant and the rustic. According to Henrik v. Achen, dr.art and professor at the University of Bergen (Fortidsvern 4/97), the telegraph building in Bergen stands out as possibly Norway’s finest example of neo-Gregorian “colonial style” architecture. The telegraph hall in the telegraph building in Bergen was a Hall with a capital H. Employees felt as if this was the hub of all of Telegrafverket’s activities. We may gain an insight into how it was to work here through Finn Jahren’s book series, “Glimt fra Televerks-kulturen”, where, among others, Trond Fond was one of the interviewees. Fond recounts of working in the Hall in 1952: “The first impression of my new work place was a great hall with strange, small trolleys moving on rails up under the ceiling. They went all around the hall and dropped telegrams down glass funnels to the various work stations. This system was called Hallerbanen, and was fed by the personnel out in the distribution group. They received their stacks of telegrams from the desk. Additionally, there were all the transit-telegrams which were re-distributed after a necessary detour via Bergen. There was a conveyor belt leading from the telegram telephone and from the various expeditors’ desks out to the distribution. These manual aid systems were not by any means silent. There was a steady hum and clicking-sound, and you’d only notice the noise when the afternoon watch turned them off as the traffic slowed down.” The building was designed by the architects, Berner and Kielland. The beautiful facades, in particular the front façade facing the park, are intact and still display the original symbols, window grilles and permanent wall lamps. The public reception hall is also an impressive piece of architecture with its curved glass ceiling, frescoes and even a specially designed floor lamp. The size of the building is 1520 m2. In 1997 the telegraph building was sold by Telenor to a private company for the sum of 82 million NOK.

  • The telegraph station in Kongsberg

    Klokkerbakken, Kongsberg
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    Constructed in 1928, the previous tele-building in Kongsberg is brick built with a plastered finish in a neo-classical style. Initially, the ground floor was rented out and functioned as a post office and library, while Telegrafverket ran their activities on the first floor. The second floor contained accommodation for both the telegraph manager and the postmaster The building was constructed around a strict economic framework. The Parliament’s committee for postal- and telegraph services had granted a sum of 140 000 NOK for the build, and made it clear that the utmost thrift was necessary so as not to exceed this amount. The previous Kongsberg tele-building is situated in Myntgata 4 (Klokkerbakken) within the town’s cultural centre, and is a good example of “public” neo-classicism. Particularly its façade, entrance hall and stairwells, are worthy of preservation. When the building was sold by Telenor in 1996/97, it was in use as an information centre. Today the building houses Telegrafen Legekontor (medical surgery). Floor area: 248 m2 (1955) 254 m2 (1968)

  • The telegraph building in Kirkenes

    Kirkegaten 2, Kirkenes
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    The telegraph building in Kirkenes was constructed in 1955 and is one of Norway’s best preserved office buildings from the post-war era. It is typical of the period of reconstruction after the war and stand out as a prime example of the modern architecture of its time. The building has seen no significant alterations throughout the years, and appears today virtually as it did in 1955. The building is situated centrally in Kirkenes near the town hall and post office. These three form a symmetrical public square, a not uncommon planning practice after the war, and produce an obvious and accessible gathering point for the inhabitants of the municipality in addition to pointing out the presence of the public services. Also the specially engineered flag poles outside are listed for preservation. The building contained a fitter’s station in the cellar and service accommodation in the attic. The 360m2 structure was designed by the architects, Blakstad and Munthe-Kaas. Today (2016) the building is owned by the Russian General Consulate. Adress: Kirkegaten 2

  • Sea cable house at Eide in Odda

    Eide, Odda
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    This sea cable house is linked with an equivalent house at Sandvin, which has also been given a protection order. Due to their shape these sea cable houses gained the nickname, “Sputnik”. The houses are small, round and topped with a pointy, aluminium roof without windows. They were also used to house frequency inverters and regenerators. The cable houses in Odda were built in 1966 by the sea cable services, and served as inlets for a 14 wire-pair cable. The year after, a 38 pair cable was stretched between the two houses. The “Sputnik” model was used for both sea cable and for long distance cable. The first telephone kiosks arrived around 1950, and were intended for emergency telephones and were installed by mountain passes by the KNA (the Royal Norwegian Automobile Club). These have later been gifted to NAF (the Norwegian Automobile Association). This type was supposedly manufactured in both aluminium and iron/steel. Constructed: 29.01.1966

  • Sea cable house at Sandvin in Odda

    Sandvin, Odda
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    This sea cable house is linked with an equivalent house at Eide, which has also been given a protection order. Due to their shape these sea cable houses gained the nickname, “Sputnik”. The houses are small, round and topped with a pointy, aluminium roof without windows. They were also used to house frequency inverters and regenerators. The cable houses in Odda were built in 1966 by the sea cable services, and served as inlets for a 14 wire-pair cable. The year after, a 38 pair cable was stretched between the two houses. The “Sputnik” model was used for both sea cable and for long distance cable. The first telephone kiosks arrived around 1950, and were intended for emergency telephones and were installed by mountain passes by the KNA (the Royal Norwegian Automobile Club). These have later been gifted to NAF (the Norwegian Automobile Association). This type was supposedly manufactured in both aluminium and iron/steel. Constructed: 29.01.1966 The house was still in service in 2016.

  • Sea cable house by Telegrafbukta (Telegraph Bay) in Tromsø

    Telegrafbukta
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    There is a small, red house by the beach in the popular recreational area, Telegrafbukta, on the south end of Tromsøya. The house and the sea cable going over to Tisnes, has given Telegrafbukta its name. In 1869 the cable arrived from Tisnes to Lanes on Tromsøya. There were often problems with this line, and a new cable was therefore laid in 1894 from Tisnes to this sea cable house by Telegrafbukta.

  • A Satellite dish on Svalbard

    Isfjord radio, Telegrafbukta
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    Isfjord Radio was established in 1933, but was completely demolished by the Germans in 1942. The station was rebuilt in 1946. When flights over the Polar region started in the mid-1950s, the station became an important control station for such routes as the one crossing the North Pole on the way to Japan. The technical wing of the building was doubled in size when the station was extended to become a satellite earth station in 1978-79. A thirteen metre satellite dish was installed in 1979 to create a satellite link to Eik Earth Station. Over this connection Svalbard was linked to the automatic Norwegian and international networks in 1981. The satellite dish was installed in 1979. In 2006 Telenor sold the buildings to the mining company, Store Spitsbergen Kullkompani, who is hiring them out to the leisure industry. The current (2016) tenant is the tourism company, Basecamp Explorer.

  • Rørvik radio line station

    Gnr/bnr 10/1, Rørvik
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    Rørvik radio line station was set up in 1967. In 1988 a new and more powerful mast with a height of 80 meters was erected. This mast accommodates 13 radio lines, the minor ones going to light house stations at Folda, town-stations and fishery settlements. The major ones go out to the district network and broadband radio lines in the regional- and national network. The mast is self-supported without guywires, and is typical of the progress in the 80s and 90s.

  • Mast and radio line house on Randvikheia by Risør

    Søndeled, Randvikheia
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    The radio line house on Randvikheia was built in 1956 of plastered concrete and is equipped with a self-supported lattice tower mast. The mast is 59 metres high. This is a radio line station for the line between Oslo and Kristiansand via Fredrikstad and functioned as a narrowband facility based on UHF with a bandwidth equivalent to 60 telephone channels. The radio line was used for tele traffic, but is no longer in service. The station had a TV-transmitter installed on the 3 October 1997.

  • Iron mast for radiolines

    Kautokeino, Kautokeino
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    It was this mast that connected Kautokeino to the automatic national network. It was erected in 1981 to provide Kautokeino with more outgoing and ingoing lines in conjunction with the 1983 automatization. This is an iron mast for radio lines and represents a type of “Eiffel tower mast.” This means that it is self-supportive without the need for guy-wires, which also explains why it can stand in the middle of the settled area of Kautokeino.

  • A telephone booth in a Narvesen kiosk, Oslo

    Karl Johans gate, Karl Johans gate
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    Pre 1900, the company, AS Telefonkioskene, enjoyed a monopoly in supplying telephone booth services to Oslo. This was a cooperation between Oslo Telefonanlegg (OTA) and Narvesen Kioskkompani (A business running kiosks and newsstands). The agreement was that OTA would rent a space in Narvesen’s newsstands. When the contract expired on the 1 December 1935, Oslo Telefonanlegg took over the running of 57 telephone booths in 28 Narvesen kiosks. At the same time the telephone fee dropped from 15 øre to 10 øre. The telephone booths stayed on in the newsstands even when the agreement came to a close. As late as in 1939 there were still 54 of them in use. The harbour area was not included in the contract, so the first of the red telephone booths was installed in the quay dedicated to the great America liners in 1933.

  • A telephone booth in the Swiss chalet style at Nesodden

    Karl Johans gate
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    In rural areas, telephone booths installed by the private phone companies could bear the likeness of small pavilions, like here at Nesodden where we find this hexagonal telephone kiosk in the Swiss chalet style. Such small, local versions would often be connected to the local, manual telephone exchange.

  • Cable house in Auli by Tønsberg

    Auli
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    The Auli cable house is one of four long distance cable houses covering the stretch between Oslo and Telemark, including a branch going off to Tønsberg. It’s a humble house in a neo-classicistic style, constructed in plastered brick, and topped by a time typical pyramidal roof covered in zinc. The door and windows were originally highlighted by the plasterwork. The building was externally restored in 2013 Constructed: 1935 Base area: 12 sq. metres. The cable house is still in service (2016).

  • Cable distribution box in Bergen

    Nyhavnsveien 4, Gamle Bergen
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    National romantic/jugendstil cast iron distribution box. These originate from the private company, Bergen Telefonkompani (1883-1947), and this type was apparently only in use in Bergen. In 1912 the people of Bergen decided that all cables were to go underground. These distribution boxes date from that time.

  • Sjøkabelhusene mellom Beritsjordet og Alnes i Finnmark

    Beritsjord
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    The cable crossing the sound, Kvalsundet, from Beritsjordet to Alnes was laid in 1935, but the cable houses were blown up and burnt by the Germans in the autumn of 1944. The current cable houses were in all likelihood constructed at some point in the 1950s. Both houses have recently been restored. The house at Beritsjordet also has five preserved telephone poles. Location: Kvalsundet, Finnmark Constructed: Beginning of the 1950s

  • The sea cable house at Tronvik on Jeløy

    Tronvik, Beritsjord
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    In 1930 a three sq. metre cable house was built on Jeløy. This house is produced to Telegrafvesenet’s standard for sea cable houses and was used to receive the sea cable crossing the Oslo fjord, from Jeløya to Horten. Both the cables have been preserved, but the house on the Horten-side has been demolished. The house sits in a beautiful location and has had a small porch added to it. Inside it is even equipped with a small table complete with a table cloth, and it is said that the telegraph manager brought his wife here to enjoy the sunset and end the day with a glass of white wine.

  • The sea cable houses at Beritsjordet and Alnes in Finnmark

    Alnes
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    The cable crossing the sound, Kvalsundet, from Beritsjordet to Alnes was laid in 1935, but the cable houses were blown up and burnt by the Germans in the autumn of 1944. The current cable houses were in all likelihood constructed at some point in the 1950s. Both houses have recently been restored. The house at Beritsjordet also has five preserved telephone poles. Location: Kvalsundet, Finnmark Constructed: Beginning of the 1950s

  • Antenna Masts in Vigreskogen

    Rogaland radio, Vigreskogen
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    The installation consists of 10 masts by the transmitter station for Rogaland Radio. Each mast is 50 metres high and carry directional antennas for short wave transmitters and dipolar carpet antennas, all placed in a particular pattern so as to cover all directions. The wires criss-crossing the site, and which from a distance looked somewhat like a fishing net, were for security reasons removed in 2013. The antennas were erected in 1959

  • Cable house at Miland in Tinn

    Miland
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    The Miland cable house is a good example of a typical “standard house” from Telenor. It’s a pre-fab house, delivered in elements and assembled on location. This type was common from the 30s and on to the 60s. Miland fitter’s station and telephone exchange is situated in its immediate vicinity and are also included in Telenor Cultural Heritage’s protection plan. Constructed: Around 1955

  • Cable house at Nordby in Ski

    Nordby
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    The Nordby cable house is one of the very first brick built long distance cable houses with a slate roof. The house’s original cable rack is still in place. Technical equipment was present here up till the spring of 2016 when it was taken out of service. Constructed: 1924/25

  • Berger automatic telephone exchange

    Berger
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    The Berger automatic telephone exchange was originally built in 1934 and measured 14 square metres. The house was extended by 16 sq.metres in 1968, to give room to the expansion of the phone exchange which at this point reached 400 numbers. The exchange was of the 7Dd type from the STK (Standard telephone and cable factory). All the technical equipment is intact. Large portions of Norway’s telephone network were automated using this type of exchange. The 7Dd was therefore a very common model.

  • Cast iron cable distribution box in Oslo

    Oslo, Berger
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    A typical cast iron cable distribution box with a “skirt”. There were several varieties of this type and dates back to 1900. Most were installed in Oslo, but also elsewhere in the country. Notice the emblem under the letters, KTA (Kristiania Telefonanlegg), consisting of two telephone receivers of the oldest type. This one is to be found outside Stattholdergården in Oslo.

  • The fitter’s base at Miland

    Miland
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    The pin-up calendar in the workshop insists that the year is 1967, and the clock over the workbench stopped a long time ago. At Miland fitter’s base it’s as if time has stood still. Thirty years ago, this was where the telecoms fitters of the area picked up equipment and met for lunch. Today, the base looks like a museum, a museum where you can experience the residue of a male culture, and a dying technical profession.

  • Telephone booth from Bergen Telefonkompani

    Nyhavnsveien 4, Gamle Bergen
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    The booth belonged to Bergen Telefonkompani and has today been moved to Bergen’s old town. The booths were shaped as round boxes and made out of anodized aluminium. This type had four legs and was kept open at the bottom. It was designed with local conditions in mind. It was also meant to be “maintenance-free” and built to withstand vandalism. The first examples of this type were put into service towards the end of the 1930s. Six of them were still in use in 1941. Location: Bergen’s old town

  • Telephone booth at Kampen in Oslo

    Danmarksgata 4 A, Vålerenga
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    100 telephone boxes remain in Norway, this is one of them! They were protected for their cultural importance in 2007. At most, there were over 6000 such telephone boxes in use all over the country, but the arrival of new technology and communicational possibilities reduced the demand for the little red houses. Even if the ring tone is gone, our telephone boxes have important stories to tell. Stories of a time when you couldn’t carry your phone around in your pocket. Stories about us. “The most beautiful product of this era, an unheeded invention from the chrome-epoch, of which there are thousands, on every street corner from Rådhusplassen in Oslo to the North Cape .It is the world’s most elegant telephone booth, in bright red and zinc.” Author Hans Magnus Enzensberger, “Norsk Utakt”, Universitetsforlaget 1984. “The red telephone booth represents a genuine modernist manifestation, an expression of modern Norway. In addition to its refined architectural qualities, the telephone booth’s distribution all over this country has turned it into a landmark.” The Norwegian Museum of Architecture by Birgitte Sauge, letter dated 11.11.1998. “DOCOMOMO (Documentation of Modern Monuments) sees the telephone booth as an architectural icon and as an important expression of Norway’s functionalism. The red telephone booth is also an important representative for 20th century modernism and Norwegian telecommunication.” DOCOMOMO Norway

  • The preserved line course between Hjartdal and Notodden

    Vålerenga
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    If you drive along the European route 134 through the county of Telemark, you are bound to notice the protected line course between Hjartdal and Notodden. For some it’s hard to imagine that there can be anything special about telephone poles – until you have driven across Bamlesletta in Notodden. Tall and beautiful, the historic timber poles reach up through the cultural landscape, and form a majestic line between the road and the fields. This is the last remaining stretch of the national telephone line between Kristiania and Bergen, and the oldest preserved line course in Norway. It is the upper part of the poles that’s making it difficult to stay on the road as you’re driving along in 80 kilometres per hour. Viewed through modern eyes, early telecom technology bears the likeness of gigantic jewellery: Four, iron cross bars, each carrying four small, white porcelain hats, come together to form a crown-like construction. Between each of the 120 protected poles, from crown to crown, 17 wires stretch. 17 swaying communicational threads which once were what tied Norway together. Among other things, this line made it possible for the inhabitants of Bergen to telephone Kristiania (Oslo.) -A national telephone-/telegraph line between Kristiania and Bergen was started in 1896 and completed in 1900. -Protection order served: 1996 -The stretch; Notodden – Hjartdal is the oldest preserved line course in Norway. -Last restoration on the stretch, Hjartdal: 2015 -Last restoration on the stretch, Notodden, after a storm in December 2013, was executed in 2014. -Number of poles in this course: 120

  • Line course between Hovden and Bjåen in the highest reaches of Setesdalen

    Hovden, Bjåen
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    This was not only a national course, but also a mountain course. This meant, among other things, that its construction was particularly durable with heavy-duty pole spars, so that it would withstand snow and extreme weather. Additionally, the distance between the wires was greater to provide better sound quality. The line course was restored in 1996. Constructed: Approx. 1920 Number of poles: 90

  • The sami telephone exchange

    Karasjok, Karasjok
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    The last manual telephone exchange in Norway was closed down as late as in 1993. It was situated in Karasjok and the telephone operators there didn’t just connect calls, they were also translators. 1979: While nationwide automatization of telephone lines was happening at full speed, the mayor of Karasjok, Hans Guttorm, decided to put on the brakes. Hang on. What would the Sami people from the interior of Finnmark do now, if the telephone operators weren’t going to be there to help them call the Norwegian doctor, or find their way in the telephone catalogue? The catalogue wasn’t compatible with Sami naming customs, and a large part of the Sami in Karasjok did not speak Norwegian. They had become used to using the ladies at the exchange as translators and guides. Mayor Guttorm led a panel to evaluate the tele services presented to the Sami-speaking population of Finnmark. Telenor (Televerket) took these signals to heart, and kept the exchange as a Sami-speaking service

  • The emergency exchange at Åsen

    Kyrre Greppsgate 19, Torshov, Åsen sentral
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    THE DOOMSDAY ROOM In a secluded cellar at Torshov in Oslo lies one of very few reminders of how the Cold War affected Norway. -Do you see that grating over there? Down those stairs, that’s where it is. Laila Andersen from Telenor Cultural Heritage, points towards a white painted metal fence encompassing what seems like an ordinary set of steps leading down to a cellar. Down those steps, behind half a metre of concrete door, we find one of the most extraordinary objects on Telenor’s protection plan; a secret doomsday room. The hidden emergency exchange in the cellar of Åsen tele building is a direct consequence of the Cold War, and of the fear of total annihilation. Let’s rewind to October 1962. For thirteen dramatic days the whole world held its breath. We have never (as far as we know) been so close to an all-out nuclear war. The Cold War between the east and the west reached a climax when the Soviet Union decided to move nuclear missiles with the capacity to reach US cities to Cuba. The USA, on the other hand, had already positioned mid-range missiles pointing towards the Soviet Union in Turkey. Intense negotiations between President John F. Kennedy and the Soviet leader, Nikita Khrusjtsjov, were initiated. Both of them had their finger hovering over their respective red buttons. At the last moment the Soviet ships carrying weapons to Cuba turned back, and the crisis was cancelled. The world society was left in a state of shock; doomsday had never felt more real. Also Norway stood in standby during the Cuban Missile Crisis; the military was on high alert. Telenor’s (Televerket) emergency exchange at Åsen is one of very few remaining traces of civilian vigilance. In the event of an attack, 15 unsuspecting telephone operators would be transported here through the Telegraph building in Kongensgate. -They were frightened of the Soviets, says Laila, as she battles a troublesome zip. -The means of communication is often the first thing to be under attack in a war. This principle is noticable in the regimes of today as well, where the political leaders are trying to gag free speech. That’s why, in the beginning of the 1960s, there was a plan for how the telegraphists would be transported here. Of course, they knew nothing. The plan was top-secret.

  • Bergen broadcaster at Askøy

    Askøy kringkaster,
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    The old long-/medium-wave broadcaster at Erdal was built in 1936/37. The first transmission from the NRK was aired from Erdal on 28 November 1937 and the last on 1 November 1978. The Bergen broadcaster is a functionalist style building in plastered concrete. The house was built around a German Telefunken transmitter. The transmitter is unique, still in its place and in perfect condition. It was taken out of service in 1978. Today, the house is clad in both standing and horizontal panelling boards. Two 150 metre iron masts from 1937 are still standing. The broadcaster was given a protection order by the Directorate for Cultural Heritage in 2000. The protection order includes the transmissions building with its exterior, interiors, technical equipment (machine equipment), permanent inventory, and the mast foundations. The buildings are today owned by Askøy municipality, and serve as a museum and activity centre for those interested in radio. Among other things, they operate an amateur radio station from here. Its call sign is LA1ASK.

  • Dolviken sea cable depot

    Dolviken, Fana
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    A RARE TREASURE AT THE WATER’S EDGE If you follow the coast southwards from Bergen city centre, you will eventually notice an unusual house. With its outward facing angles, open loading hatch and large, iron loading crane, Dolviken sea cable depot is constructed to load enormous sea cables onto specially built cable ships. The red and yellow building from 1960 is the last sea cable house in Norway which is still in operation, but its time is inexorably coming to an end. New technologies like Satellite and mobile networks are about to make sea cables antiquated. What’s going to happen to the concrete building in Søreide then? Situated as it is in one of Bergen’s most attractive plots, it is likely to have been one of those buildings that would have been demolished to make room for some attractive apartments. That’s not what Telenor Cultural Heritage wanted. Dolviken sea cable depot was given a protection order in 1997 and added to the company’s list of cultural heritage which means that the slightly tattered industrial building will be preserved and looked after for the future. Antiquarian, Ellen Hole, is pleased. In 2015 she was assigned by Telenor to evaluate the condition of this object of protection. She concluded that the sea cable depot inhabits not just a local value, but also a national and even global importance.

  • The preserved line course between Notodden and Hjartdal

    Fana
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    If you drive along the European route 134 through the county of Telemark, you are bound to notice the protected line course between Notodden and Hjartdal. For some it’s hard to imagine that there can be anything special about telephone poles – until you have driven across Bamlesletta in Notodden. Tall and beautiful, the historic timber poles reach up through the cultural landscape, and form a majestic line between the road and the fields. This is the last remaining stretch of the national telephone line between Kristiania and Bergen, and the oldest preserved line course in Norway. It is the upper part of the poles that’s making it difficult to stay on the road as you’re driving along in 80 kilometres per hour. Viewed through modern eyes, early telecom technology bears the likeness of gigantic jewellery: Four, iron cross bars, each carrying four small, white porcelain hats, come together to form a crown-like construction. Between each of the 120 protected poles, from crown to crown, 17 wires stretch. 17 swaying communicational threads which once were what tied Norway together. Among other things, this line made it possible for the inhabitants of Bergen to telephone Kristiania (Oslo.) -A national telephone-/telegraph line between Kristiania and Bergen was started in 1896 and completed in 1900. -Protection order served: 1996 -The stretch; Notodden – Hjartdal is the oldest preserved line course in Norway. -Last restoration on the stretch, Hjartdal: 2015 -Last restoration on the stretch, Notodden, after a storm in December 2013, was executed in 2014. -Number of poles in this course: 120

  • Vigra broadcaster

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    In 1934, it was decided to build a broadcaster in the Ålesund-district. This was one year after the state had taken over all broadcasting services in Norway. After several proposals had been rejected due to too small a size, inferior radio technical location or danger to air-traffic, engineer Haakon Otterbech from the Telegraph board cast his gaze to the islands outside the town of Ålesund. “No airport will ever be built here,” it was said. Vigra was chosen, and the building work started in the spring of 1935. A station building and two 106 metre high masts were constructed. The test-broadcast went on air in November 1935 with an American 10kW transmitter from RCA (Radio Corporation of America). In 1939 a 100 kW transmitter was installed. The station has been known both as the Ålesund broadcaster and the Møre broadcaster, but after 1936 it was named the Vigra broadcaster. The Vigra broadcaster inhabits an interesting war time history. In April 1940, the transmitter was bombed by the Germans and put out of service. The original broadcaster –including bullet holes- is preserved as a curiosity, and displayed in the new station building. The original, single storey, wooden station building from 1940 and the feeder house have been preserved. The station features horizontal cladding typical to Western Norway, two-frame windows, and a “neo-classicistic” double entrance door. Its area is 7 by 7 metres. The building included in Telenor’s protection plan is the new station in plastered brick which was opened 12 April 1948. In 1952 the transmitter antenna was replaced with a cylindrical, self-complementary antenna of 242 metres. In 1997 it was shortened to 232 metres out of consideration to Ålesund airport. After a decision made by the NRK (Norwegian Broadcasting Company), the broadcasts from the Vigra broadcaster was ended on 30 June 2011. The antenna mast was taken down on 8 September, that same year.

  • Rogaland Radio. The receiver station at Skjæveland

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    In 1960 the world’s most advanced short-wave radio station opened at Skjæveland, Sandnes. At this point Rogaland Radio took over as the national short-wave station after Bergen Radio. At its peak more than half a million telegrams were sent from here every year. The Telenor veteran, Egil Reimers remembers the work environment at the receiver station as particularly good.

  • Line course at Lebesby in Finnmark

    Fana
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    After the war, Lebesby became an important line test-point, where the lines were tested for faults. In 1945 a small building was put up near the line, where the telegraph was placed and where line tests were performed. Towards the end of the 1950s, the station manager built a new house by the church in the centre of Lebesby. As this location was approx. three kilometres away from the original station, a costly rebuild was done simultaneously to bring all the lines in a loop up to the new house, and thus a new exchange was established here. With this, it was hoped that line tests could be executed quicker and that the repairs could be improved on. This junction, which has been given a protection order, is a unique three-sided junction with a four-way course leading off in three directions. It was erected at the end of the 50s. 30 poles have been preserved around the junction, but this number will be cut somewhat during 2017/18.

  • Signal building at Kongens Gate 21, Oslo

    Kongensgate 21, Fana
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    Only a stone’s throw from Karl Johans gate is one of the capital’s grandest buildings, and one of the most important in terms of Norwegian telecom history, the Telegraph Building at Kongens Gate 21. We are in Oslo’s oldest district; this is the part of the city founded by King Chistian IV after the city fire in 1624. In contrast to the rest of the city with its less rigid road network, the streets here are laid out in a tight grid. For a long time, this was the city centre, the Christiania proper. As the city grew, however, the centre moved, and the quarter was overtaken by the business sector, important administrations buildings and cultural institutions. Approximately in the centre of this square, in the crossing between Prinsens Gate and Kongens Gate, there is a towering colossus. 2140 sq. metres covered in heavy, grey granite. The windows on the ground floor are placed high up on the wall, and are protected by black, iron bars, and there’s just a sober, lit-up sign revealing exactly what building we’re standing in front of: “TELEGRAF TELEFON.” This was the main seat of Telenor, and up to the mid-nineties, the country’s most important telecoms exchange. This was truly where it was happening. This place received messages of war and of peace, and it was through here that Norway made contact with the world abroad. And then there were all the small, private conversations. There were hundreds of switchboard operators, working in dense formation, connecting people. 19 departments from the Oslo district were gathered under one roof when the Telegraph building was opened in January 1924.

  • The main transmitter at Tronfjell

    Tronfjell
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    With its 1666 metres above sea level, Tronfjell in Alvdal municipality was early on seen as a good site for a FM- and TV- station and as a relay point for the radio line, Oslo –Trondheim. Construction of the main building commenced in the summer 1959, with extensions started in 1960 and 1968. It became clear from the outset, that Tron was a good choice for tele communicational purposes. TV broadcasts were initiated in 1963. The very first message going out through the transmitter was the news of the murder of John F. Kennedy. A five-floor “Neumann-tower” with an additional antenna loft was erected. The height, including the mast at the pinnacle, is 49.3 metres. Due to problems with ice, the tower was clad in plastic sheeting around 1970. A new living section and a room for a new generator were added in 1970/71. The living section consists of a kitchen, a living room, two bedrooms, a hall and a bathroom. A tunnel was constructed between the low-built new section and the tower. REMINISCING Before the Second World War, the broadcasting of radio programs was underpinned by a network of long- and medium-wave transmitters. In many areas, however, the reception was very bad, and it became evident that technical equipment needed to be placed at the highest possible altitude. Establishing a network of broadcasting equipment on mountain tops improved the quality significantly. In 1933 the Parliament approved that the state would take over all broadcasting activities in Norway. NRK (the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation) was established, and retained the exclusive rights to all radio broadcasting in the country until the arrival of local radio stations in the 1980s. In conjunction with the creation of NRK, Telegrafverket was assigned the work of planning, building and running the broadcasting transmitters. In other words; NRK was behind the program content, and Telegrafverket made sure it reached the listeners. In August 1956 the board of Telegrafverket gave its recommendation to the development of television in Norway. After the Second World War television grew as a new broadcasting medium in the western world. Due to its scattered habitation and difficult topography with fjords, mountains and valleys, Norway turned out to be one of the world’s most challenging countries to develop for broadcasting purposes. Trials of television started in 1954. Television in Norway was officially opened in 1960 with regular transmissions from the start. Towards the end of the 1960s, 90% of Norwegian households had the opportunity to watch television. Broadcasting transmitters were built on mountain tops all across the country to reach the population and give everyone access to television. Throughout the first years, transmissions were in black and white. Colour TV did not arrive until 1972. Preceding this was a comprehensive public debate and parliamentary decisions. Many were of the opinion that it was far more important to extend black and white television to all parts of the country before allowing ourselves the luxury of colour.

  • Bergen Radio, Rundemanen

    Bergen radio,
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    The transmission station of Bergen Radio was officially opened 1 September 1912. The facility consisted of a radio station with a station building, functionary accommodation and a transformer house, and was located 560 metres above sea level and three kilometres from the centre of Bergen. Rundemanen was out of reach of enemy war ships, while still within an area protected by the fortification at Kvarven. After the government granted 80.000 NOK for the construction of Bergen Radio on 4 May 1911, the station was officially opened on 1 September 1912. The station building is a wooden construction without a cellar, and of an adapted national-romantic style. Apart from the service-desk room and transmitter room, the building contained an office, a small battery room and a veranda. In 1912 the transmitter was a 5kW spark-gap transmitter from Telefunken with a reach of 350 nautical miles. The transformer house was constructed using a bricklaying style called, “Ålesundsmur,” and roofed in copper. It has been demolished. A separate machine house, complete with a workshop, a generator and tools have been preserved. The lineman’s recidence, built in 1919-1920, was demolished in 1982. The building was constructed in stone over one and a half storeys plus cellar, and contained a family apartment, various bedrooms and a store room. Also the mess building, or functionary residence, was taken down in 1982. This building from 1912 was constructed out of wood over one and a half storeys with a cellar. The house’s ground floor contained the manager’s apartment and a canteen while the first floor was fitted out with a number of flats. Using a mobile phone, you can access images and hear stories of how it was to work at the transmitter station 60 years ago. You can also sign in to a digital guest book. The guide is a permanent offer to all hikers taking a break by the building at Rundemanen. The transmitter station and machine house had their exteriors restored by the Norwegian Telecom Museum in collaboration with the Cultural Heritage Management Office in Bergen in 2012.

  • Line course by the old Seltunåsen in Lærdal

    Seltunåsen
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    This protected line course is 2, 5 km long and passes the old Seltunåsen. Incorporated in the course are plastic cables with copper and fibre. The course received a protection order and became part of Telenor Cultural Heritage’s protection plan in 2016. The road between Seltunåsen and Galdane has always been seen as the most difficult and dangerous stretch to pass. The valley is narrow and the terrain is steep and rocky. When frozen, it was even worse. The old public road and riding path over Seltunåsen was taken out of use in 1793 when a new road was built via Galdane. This road is constructed as a 1-2 metre high wall out of rocks which follows the terrain. It is situated on the north side of Lærdalselvi, between the river and the rock-slide prone mountain sides.

  • A line course in Engerdalssetra

    Engerdal
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    This course is a well preserved national- and subscription line course on one and the same pole. It’s likely that the course initially was a pure national course. Because of short poles, it was problematic to make space for expansions when the need for subscription lines increased. The problem was solved by using 8-way pole arms, in the Norwegian technical terminology called telefonjern nr.4. With this type of pole arm, better use was made of the pole length, and fewer poles had to be replaced. Apart from this, it was common to adapt the width of the line course to the surroundings. Around house corners, passing fruit trees and through woodlands, it was often more suitable with a narrower line course. The type of pole spar or pole arm and their width can therefore vary throughout a subscription course. The protected stretch consist of approximately 100 poles with rare 6- and 8-way pole spars (pole arms) Parts of this line course carry cable that is still in use.

  • Iron pole in Mandal

    Skottholsheia, Mandal
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    The iron pole in Mandal is centrally placed in town and in its original location. The pole was restored in 1998. Location: Skottholsheia, Mandal Gnr./bnr.: 169/1417 Year of construction: 1910

  • Stavanger Radio at Ullandhaug, transmitter station for fixed radio communication

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    The transmitter station for Stavanger Radio – called the America telegraph- was situated in the granite house which today is used by NRK Rogaland. The hexagonal house next to it was a transformer house. It was in service from 1919 to 1932 when it was superseded by Jeløy transmitter station. From 1936 to 1982 the station was used for the Stavanger medium-wave broadcaster. In 1987 the transmitter building was decorated to be re-purposed as TV-studios for NRK Rogaland. The architect behind the facility was Ole Sverre, known for designing, among other things, the Agricultural College at Ås, Holmenkollen Turisthotell and the rebuild of the Grand Hotel in Oslo. On the 12 July 1913, the newspaper, Stavanger Aftenblad contained the following review of the facility: “At Udlandshaug the transmitter station is to be constructed out of bricks and mortar. It will be a great, large building which will rise terrace-like in 1,2 and 3 storeys. The interior will mainly consist of one large room which will run through all three storeys, but on the first floor under the second and third storey section, there are smaller chambers, like a dark room and others for technical use. The great hall does thus not extend over just one floor, but in terraces, connected by staircases and with a projecting balcony providing a view over it all. The architect has shaped the house as a shell covering the form required by Marconi’s machines.” The transmitter at Ullandhaug was one of the noisiest work places in the country. The farmers of the area didn’t just complain about the noise pollution, they also threatened to go to court due to an alleged drop in property prices. The noise was caused by the spark that carried the Morse signal, the large flywheels and the compressed-air nozzles. While at work, the technicians would use English artillery ear defenders, and it is said that the ground shook when transmissions were taking place. The spark signal went out via a directional antenna at 1070 metres. The antenna was constructed out of 24 bronze wires. It was directed towards North-America (Boston) and was held up by ten 122 metre masts. Every mast was in turn stabilised by six guys and weighed 62 metric tons. It is still possible to see the remains of some of the masts’ fundaments and the guy fastenings along the trekking routes towards Auglendshøgda. It was the traffic to America that dominated the transmissions, thereof the name, Amerikatelegrafen. While Ullandhaug sent telegrams to America, the returning traffic reached the receiver station at Nærland (see F-05), which required less space than the transmitter. Between the two there was a normal telegraph line. The building of Amerikatelegrafen was largely spurred on by the great Norwegian emigration to America. Already in 1914, everything was ready to receive the technical equipment from England, but the First World War put a regrettable stop to the project. The equipment never arrived in Norway, but ended up in Egypt instead. It wasn’t till five years later that the traffic could be started, luckily with a far superior transmitter than the one which was originally intended for Ullandhaug. The traffic was eventually reaching numbers of 100.000 telegrams per year sent from Ullandhaug. Amerikatelegrafen became particularly important for news coverage. During the World Championships in boxing in 1921, Stavanger Radio was able to relay the result by telephone to the newspapers only 15 minutes after the fight had finished. This was a new record at the time. Even so, the technology was soon to be out of date. Demands for modernisation were put forward just a few years after the opening, and in the summer of 1925, a new receiver was built at Fornebu. The transmitter at Ullandhaug was partly superseded by Jeløy from 1930, but it wasn’t till the 1 July 1932 that the spark transmitter at Ullandhaug, popularly called the Fright of the Ether Sea, was taken out of service.

  • Stavanger Radio at Nærland in Hå, Rogaland

    Nærland,
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    Receiver for fixed radio communication The receiver station for Rogaland Radio was located at Nærland in Hå. The station was put into operation in 1919, but had a short life-span. Already in 1926 it was shut down when the receiver station at Fornebu took over. The hexagonal accumulator house is preserved in addition to the water tower. The house is of a similar type to that at Ullandhaug. It is today used as a chapel and has been served a protection order by the municipality of Hå. It is in the ownership of Nærlandsparken AS.

  • Lærdal telegraph station

    Øyragata 44, Lærdal
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    The house was built in 1845 and has been used as, among other things, a hotel and a pharmacy. The telegraph station was opened in 1858, simultaneously with the line, Kristiania-Lillehammer-Gjøvik-Lærdal. The line was extended to Bergen the year after. The building has now been taken over by Lærdal municipality, and is used as a culture centre, with, among other things, a permanent exhibition from the Norwegian Telecom Museum. The house is situated near the protected area of Lærdalsøyri, and is architecturally at home in the late empire style, typical of the 1840s and 50s.

  • Pole shed in Hodndalen, Lærdal

    Hodndalen
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    Pole sheds are only to be found in mountaineous areas, and this shed in Hodnedalen are by all accounts the last of its kind in more or less completeness. The shed is simple, and was erected as a “tent-shaped” structure, and finally clad in course, tar-burnt, wooden planks. It was used to store spare poles which were dragged in in the wintertime. It could accommodate around ten poles. The building with an area of 2.5 x 11 metres is constructed on a foundation of natural stone. Year of construction: 1924

  • Iron pole in Stavanger

    Øvre Strandgate 67,
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    The iron pole in Mandal is centrally placed in town and in its original location. The pole was restored in 1998. Location: Skottholsheia, Mandal Gnr./bnr.: 169/1417 Year of construction: 1910

  • The main transmitter at Holtberget in Kongsvinger

    Holtberget
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    Situated at Holtberget, is one of Norkring’s many main transmitters for broadcasting sound and image. It was erected in 1967 and had a frequency converter fitted in 1968. The converter got its program signals from Mistberget near Eidsvoll. This guyed lattice mast is 163 meters high. In 2007, a new antenna for the televisual digital ground network was fitted to the top of the mast at Holtberget, and in February 2009 the old analogue TV signals were shut down. For radio, the station is equipped with both FM- transmitters and digital radio transmitters (DAB). FM transmissions were initiated on 26 June 1970, while televisual transmissions started on the 18 December, the year before. The station is currently used for transmitting all NRK channels, P4 and for the mobile networks of Telenor, Telia and ICE. It is also used by broadband service-providers, Nødnett (emergency network), NRK reportage and as a central hub for local radio lines and for parts of a nationwide radio line grid.

  • Line course in Landersfjord by Laksefjorden in Finnmark

    Laksefjord, Landersfjord
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    This line course is a typical national course. The length of the poles is adapted to the terrain, and to lessen the strain on the poles themselves. This course stretches between Vadsø and Alta. Landersfjord is a place situated by Laksefjorden, between Ifjord and Kunes. The pole spars are of type, jern nr. 3, and is most likely rigged with 3,3 mm copper wire. The course is still in service. Construction year: 1947 Number of poles: 115, but this number will eventually be halved.

  • Stone poles at Klepp

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    Steinstolper var mest brukt på Jæren og er en sjeldenhet ellers i landet. Denne steinstolpen i Gaular i Sunnfjord har opprinnelig vært en bautastein fra oldtiden. Den ble tatt i bruk som telegrafstolpe i 1892. Stolpen ble gjenreist av pensjonerte «graffare» i 1990. Beliggenhet: Gaular, Sogn og Fjordane Gnr./bnr.: 116/2

  • The Tromsø broadcaster at Langnes

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    The entire facility including a feeder house was completed in the 1930s. The main building has been partly rebuilt with, among other things, new cladding. To cover the long distances to the Greenland area, a 10kW long wave transmitter was installed here. The facility carries a captivating war time history. The Tromsø broadcaster at Langnes was the last free transmitter to be in service in Norway at the start of the war, and was up and running till 7 June 1940. It is said that the Germans had the intention of bombing the installation, but missed. The reason for this was that the local population had been tipped off about the German plans, and managed to bury the transmitter in snow, resulting in a farm being bombed instead. The 55 sq. metre garage was constructed in 1940. The facility was taken out of service in 1991, and the masts taken down a few years later.

  • The telegraph station in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard

    Ny-Ålesund,
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    IN THE MIDDLE OF HISTORY The protected telegraph station in Ny-Ålesund from 1918 was shut down in 1962. At this point, more things had happened here than in most little wooden houses: Roald Amundsen, the polar explorer, came here to set his watch to Paris-time, while waiting to set out on an expedition towards the North Pole in the spring of 1926. This is also where his desperate emergency messages arrived when his plane crashed in the icy wastelands. The telegram containing the message that should have sunk the Gerhardsen government in 1963 was also sent from here. When Telenor developed a plan for the protection of its buildings and technical installations in 1997, there was never any doubt as to whether the telegraph station in Ny-Ålesund should be on the list. Throughout many years, the blue house was the lifeblood of one of the world’s northernmost human settlements, and the only possibility for its inhabitants to stay in contact with the mainland through long and isolated winters. A lot has happened since those days. Today Ny-Ålesund is a high-tech centre for arctic research and for monitoring the environment. Listening for noise from black holes 31 billion light years away, is one of the projects the scientists are currently engaged in. That’s why it’s important to turn off Wi Fi and mobile phones on arrival to Ny-Ålesund, in order to prevent any disturbances to the sensitive listening equipment.

  • Kulleseid Telegraph Station

    1219, Finnås, Kulleseid
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    Kulleseid telegraph station at Bømlo is the first house financed by Telenor (Den Norske Statstelegraf.) Its area is 52 sq. m. Kulleseid was a so called fishery station in “Søndre Vårsilddistrikt” (the southern spring-herring district), and was taken into use around New Year 1857. The first record in the telegraph station’s protocol is a message from “Directøren” (the director), dated 27 December 1857- the spring-herring fishery has started early in 1858- and it reads: Stations! From the 28th of this month, the fishery stations- Skudesnæs, Kobbervig, Espevær and Kulleseid will open. Opening hours as for relay stations on the main line… C Nielsen The house is today owned by Telenor

  • Lødingen telegraph station

    Lødingen, Finnås, Kulleseid
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    Telegrafverket established themselves at Lødingen in 1875, and this place was going to become a hub for the telegraph industry in North-Norway. When it was finished, the facility included several buildings, and was initially also a small farm with the rights to have three cattle. The station building, or the old station as it was called, with outbuildings was constructed in 1892-95 and came in with building costs of 45 887 NOK. The station is a three storey timber building on granite foundations, and roofed over with slate. The ground floor, in its entirety, was used as business premises for the telegraph service up till 1936, and consisted of an entrance hall, the outer service desk, the inner service desk, a Morse-hall, a wheatstone-hall and a Siemens-hall. The telegraph inspector’s accommodation and offices were on the first floor up till 1913. When the national telephone network emerged, it was also given space on the first floor. The top floor contained four flats with sleeping alcoves, a hallway and an open loft space used as a drying room and archive. The house is a big and impressive timber building in the Swiss chalet style, and was restored in the beginning of the 1990s. Today it contains, among other things, the Norwegian Telecom Museum’s exhibition and Lødingen Pilot Museum.

  • Stone poles at Gaular

    Gaular, Finnås, Kulleseid
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    The stone poles were mainly used at Jæren, and are rare elsewhere in the country. This stone pole situated in Gaular, Sunnfjord, was originally a stone monument from antiquity. It was put to use as a telegraph pole in 1892. The pole was re-erected by retired tele-workers in 1990. Location: Gaular in the county of Sogn og Fjordane Gnr./bnr.:116/2 (registration number of property)

  • Object of protection: Alta - the exploded poles in Mattisdalen

    Mattisdalen
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    During the Second World War, 31.500 telegraph poles were destroyed by the German invaders. When peace finally came, Telenor’s (Televerket) employees managed to re-erect over 10.000 poles in record speed, using raw muscle power and a somewhat unusual method. -It all happened in respectful silence, for no particular reason. That’s just how it was. I can’t really put it into words, tells Evald Lindgård. He was just 17 years old when he took part in raising the poles of Finnmark. He tells his story in the film, “Et liv i Televerket” (A Life In Televerket). -They were probably in need of people in this department, because father called home and said he had got me into work. The young lad got on one of the boats going from Tromsø to Hammerfest in 1945. It was fully loaded with poles, line wire and other equipment. Evald could never forget the sight that met him further up north: -All of West-Finnmark was ravaged. There was nothing left, absolutely nothing. It didn’t look real. It was hard to find anything to rest your eyes on, in a way. It was like a desert compared to what I was used to. No part of Norway was hit harder by the war than Finnmark. Homes had been burnt, fishing boats made useless, bridges and power plants demolished, and to hinder communication, tele lines were cut and poles had been broken straight off. Rumours had it that the Germans had used explosives to break the poles, but Evald is of the firm opinion that they had been shot to pieces. -As we proceeded through the terrain, we could tell whether it was a short or a tall German who had done the job. If it was a tall man the stump would be tall and if it was a short man it would be shorter. There ended up being a lot of comments like; “he would’ve been 170cm, and he was 180,” he chuckles.

  • Rogaland radio. The transmitter station

    Rogaland radio,
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    Rogaland Radio’s transmitter station is a 600 sq. metre building in the Vigre forest, 20 kilometres away from the receiver station. The distance was meant to stop disturbances to the reception caused by its own transmitters. At the most 10-12 people worked at the transmitter station in looking after the 30 transmitters.